Gatefather: A Novel of the Mithermages

Gatefather: A Novel of the Mithermages

Hot
F May 04, 2016
 
2.0
 
0.0 (0)
3079   0
Write Review
Gatefather: A Novel of the Mithermages

Books

Book # in Series
3
In Gatefather, the third installment in the Mithermages series, New York Times bestselling author Orson Scott Card continues his fantastic tale of the Mages of Westil who live in exile on Earth. 
 
Danny North is the first Gate Mage to be born on Earth in nearly 2000 years, or at least the first to survive to claim his power. Families of Westil in exile on Earth have had a treaty that required the death of any suspected Gate Mage. The wars between the Families had been terrible, until at last they realized it was their own survival in question. But a Gate Mage, one who could build a Great Gate back to Westil, would give his own Family a terrible advantage over all the others, and reignite the wars. So they all had to die. And if the Families didn't kill them, the Gate Thief would-that mysterious Mage who destroyed every Great Gate, and the Gate Mage, before it could be opened between Earth and Westil. 
 
But Danny survived. And Danny battled the Gate Thief, and won. 
 
What he didn't know at the time was that the Gate Thief had a very good reason for closing the Great Gates-and Danny has now fallen into the power of that great enemy of both Earth and Westil. 

Editor review

1 reviews

Dull story with too much dialogue and a rushed ending
(Updated: May 07, 2016)
Rating 
 
2.0

Gatefather simply put was poorly executed by author Orson Scott Card.  I am a fan of the author's SciFi books such as Ender's Game and was excited to read this urban fantasy book by him.  Sadly it fell far short of my expectations.

The story begins with young Danny, the gate mage, who has had his body taken over by the Gate Thief.  The Gate Thief uses Danny's great powers to try to have sex with teenage girls Danny knows and to troll the Internet for lude material.  And the story goes downhill from here.

There is a long dialogue about the innerself called ka and ba that I found slow moving and uninteresting.  At this point I was hoping the story would speed up and get more focused.

There were some interesting possibilities such as helicopters in the magic land and a pregnant goddess that creates an alliance by having the two leaders help deliver her baby but these plot points don't really go anywhere.

And finally the ending is rushed and understated.  I appreciated the author commentary at the end as he explained his logic for the ending but I did not agree that major battles are overdone in fantasy stories.  He also believes villains should not be greater than the heroes but who doesn't love a great villain?  I give the book two out of five stars as it has some interesting possibilities and a different viewpoint on fantasy but it did not connect with me.


Report this review Comments (0) | Was this review helpful to you? 0 0

User reviews

There are no user reviews for this listing.
Already have an account? or Create an account